Archive for the ‘sports training’ Category

 

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Over the years I have been extremely blessed to mentor new trainers and coaches and to help them get started on their path to what I hope will be a successful career for them. Many of them will ask me questions such as: what are the best exercises/ tools to use? What is the best program to help my clients get the results that they want and so-on. To me these are good questions, but the lack the most important aspect any good and effective program, the why behind it .

You see, any so called training program that lacks purpose and individualization in personal training, will most likely end up leaving the client disappointed. Especially, if they aren’t new to this whole fitness world.

 

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Just random workouts can work in getting a person leaner and somewhat stronger. Yet in my opinion that will only go so far and probably will leave glaring issues that the person has unaddressed. So instead, let’s have a reason for doing what we are doing with our clients.

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This does take more energy and forethought to make this happen, but your success will be obvious to others and lead to great results and joy from your clients!

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Wanting to fit in is a normal human desire and although it isn’t a bad thing in itself, it can influence you to be less than what you are meant to be. I don’t know how many times in the past, I have let this desire control what I said and did. As a result, I had regret and I may have robbed the other person of a chance to grow and improve. Now, I am not saying to correct everyone of every mistake that you may think that they are making or to do so without getting to know the first, but to do so when the time is appropriate and the need is really there.

There is also the need to hold on to ideas so tightly that no other information whether contradictory or even additional thought that is inline with the person’s current ideology isn’t accepted.

These two mindsets are a great way to get stuck inside of a confined space or inside of a box. You see, thinking inside of a box makes what you can do smaller, whom you can help lessen and makes your own world much tinier than it needs to be.

I am not saying to not have some guiding principles for life or for your training, I am simply saying to let those guidelines continually expand and evolve by learning from your mistakes, tracking each workout to see if what you are doing is working. Also have some sort of assessment to do once a month, that can objectively show you if it is. It can be measurements, inbody testing, movement screens one rep max testings, conditioning circuits that once killed and that you can now beat. Whatever fits your goals and that can help you get to the next level in your training.

Lastly when something new comes along get as much information about it as you can, critically evaluate it and make an informed decision on it even if it means that you must change your view and approach. If you do, you will begin to think outside the box and end up better for it!

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It seems like there are endless thoughts in this fitness and performance world about just about every subject in strength and conditioning, as well as a myriad of opinions on how to get the job done. Conditioning is no different, many coaches wrongly believe that running their athletes into complete fatigue is the way to go and to give no thought to movement quality and how the brain learns how to apply the work that we are doing to the sport that we want to improve at.

Then there are those that just use circuit training and assume that their approach will yield the results that they crave when it comes to better performance. Finally there is the group that assumes that drawn out duration training like running for miles at a time will enhance performance. The goal of this post is to not only reveal that these ideas will not work but how to better approach getting in shape for their sport.

 

The first thing that we have to understand when it comes to preparing for sports is the role of movement quality in the athlete’s training program. You see if we go to absolute fatigue often not only will our recovery take too long, but the athlete will only learn how to compensate in order to survive their session and as a result could increase their chance of injury. As well as only learning how to cheat to do a movement pattern during performance and working out.

 

 

The answer first and foremost is to view your conditioning as it is, an opportunity to improve your ability to perform a task at full capability over the long haul of play thus truly making a better athlete and conqueror, rather than just a survivor.  So in your preparation make movement quality, force production and consistency your goals in order to create a better athlete and to better prevent injury.

Secondly, Just a generalized program will only get you so far in the sport world. Grant it, that everyone must begin with a general and less specific program, however there are certain components of strength, power, work capacity and goal oriented training that helps the athlete in their sport.

 

So just a general circuit program that is used for everyone will only carry the athlete so far in the realm of performance. In the general phase, athletes need: control or stability, mobility, strength, power and various types of endurance.

Lastly, just low intensity training all of the time for length will not prepare any athlete for the riggers and demands of sport, unless they are long duration sports like: cross country and distance races.In a sports conditioning program, the energy systems of the sport need to be reviewed and then each quality should be trained in a structured way to get the individual ready for play.

Remember, athletes need power, agility, speed, and balance in varying degrees according to their sport’s needs.

Conditioning is not as easy as the old school thoughts that have been addressed in this post, but rather it is a complex task that requires planning and thought, knowing about the sport that you are working with. Finally and most importantly, you must keep power production up or speed, while maintaining movement quality.

 

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In both my random and intentional thoughts on fitness, I have been thinking about the need for control a lot lately. As you may be aware, I train a lot of athletes form the age of 8 all the way into their fifties and the one common thread that I have seen in all of these age groups is a lack of control especially (but not limited to…) their lower bodies. They usually lack the ability to control their ankles, hips and knees and or all of the above and as a result may possible be more prone to injury. Now please be aware of the fact, that most of these people are not noobs and some of them have been “working out for their whole lives.”

As then as you can see just training for fitness may not in most cases be enough to help counteract these potential risk factors for injury. What then can we do to improve this needed factor?

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To answer this question we have to first understand the role of the brain in this quality. The brain is the control center of the body in that role is the ability to control joints and movement patterns. This works by learning and experience, for example your foot learns how to respond to terrain by walking over it. When you hit a hole it will shift and try to protect your ankle and other parts. But this will only work if have hit a hole before. This is one example in way that the brain learns to control a joint or to stabilize from an outside force that could cause harm if it wasn’t dealt with.

Another example is when a baby stabilizes his or her should when they are picked up by their arm.

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So what happens when the brain doesn’t do this important reaction?

Usually it leads to some kind of injury such as when a foot over inverts and ends up “rolling” the person’s ankle or spraining it as a result.  So you see that this type of control is very important for our health and performance, especially over a lifetime of fitness and or sports.

Being aware of this fact and the need for this type of control should lead to the question of how we can improve this neurological quality and to increase our ability to get long-term fitness results.

I will endeavor to briefly answer this question and then follow it up with some practical movements in the next post to help improve this needed control.

Training this quality is not that complicated and pretty much is done in the same way that you: build strength, muscle, power and conditioning. You train with specific moves in mind for quality reps over time to develop this skill.

 

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You go from the floor as means to help you easier learn how to control your extremities. Then to more of a loaded spine position, all the way up to standing and choosing exercises that make you control yourself. In fact you can even do this with one move: The Turkish get-up.

 

This complex exercise takes you from the supine posture all the way up to standing with the added benefit of strength development, cross patterning, shoulder stabilization and mobility. It however, is not the only way to do so.

Then you will want to continue that process and add in some gait related simple to complex movements such as (but not limited to) marches, skips, hops and jumps.

As you do and focus on quality movement with fewer reps to avoid break down, you will help yourself develop better control of your body and possibly your joint health and freedom as a person.

Come back next week for part two if this post that will give you some videos and explanation how to work this process in you training and for some ideas how to put them in without neglecting your fitness goals!

 

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When I was still fighting as a boxer, the group and coach that I worked with realized the need for strength training to make you a better athlete. However, I am not sure how effective the program that we were doing was at doing that; it was a lot of slow stuff in the weight room , followed by slow running. I am not saying that slow is bad if the right reason is given to do it  and for a set time. I think however that one of our biggest training mistakes is that we didn’t do exercises to build power and explosiveness on a consistent basis and as a result , we probably missed out on being better athletes.

Even though I am no longer boxing , I recently realized that I need to develop explosive power and as a result have created this program geared around that goal and that program is the one that I am sharing with you today. So if you want to be more explosive and or if you want a different program to do for a while keep on reading and then get working.

Strength: Every program that enhances athleticism should have a time period carved out to develop strength. To me how you go about doing this is not as important as doing it. I prefer powerlifting and the three big lifts, along with accessory exercises that help you in a weak area. Olympic lifting also works to develop strength as well. So don’t get caught up in the how so much, just get stronger!

Once you have done this for your set amount of weeks, you will now want to work on building power  in two different ways: one, you will want use Olympic lifting, heavy Kettlebells and so on to build power. Two: you will want to develop explosive power or convert you strength into power. This is done by doing plyometrics, med ball work, light to medium sized kettlebells, sand bags, dumbbells and possibly barbells.

Power and the ability to explode and or move quickly is associated with the ability to become a better athlete in many regards. Explosive power is linked to speed and even more efficient endurance performance in my opinion. It is the a need for anyone that wants to perform at their top-level if they play a sport as well as those who want to change the focus of their workout for a while in order to better avoid over-training.

Just before we get into the program itself, let’s review how to become more explosive. Strength training and getting stronger in and of itself will most likely not be enough to produce this quality. It does however have a need in the process and also may I mention there is some research that says if the intent to move heavy weight quickly is present the explosive muscles fibers are activated and one becomes more explosive as a result. In spite of this fact, this blogger feels that both are needed to enhance performance.

Without further ado my friends we have the program:

As any long-term program goes this is one is a progressive and builds up as it goes along.

This is a 6 week program

Day 1:
Velocity based training day

Barbell cleans ; 50% of your one rep max
Week 1: 6 x 3 sets 2 minutes rest move the weight as fast as possible (thus the light weight)
Supersetted with half kneeling chop and lifts 15 to 25 lbs 8 reps x 2 sets

Week 2 to 4:

Add in a rep on each set
Week 3: move it faster
Week 4: add in another set
Week 5: adjust , work on technique move the weight faster and so-on
Week 6: add 5 lbs to the bar

The chop and lifts should progress from load to lunge position for 2 weeks to single leg supported
Push press 50% 1 rep max 8 x 2 sets as fast as possible 3 minutes rest (please follow this rest exercise is cumulative and not just about 1 session)

This should be treated the same as the clean in its progression throughout the weeks

Y,T, M,s 2x 4 each

Shuttle run:

week one 4 sets 40 yards 30 seconds rest

week 2 add in a round

Week 3 : get all of your rest down to 30 seconds

Week 4: add in a round

Week 5: Go faster

Week 6: add in a round

Day 2: Strength day:
This is the one day of grinds you can possibly put in any move that you want to work on, just don’t go crazy!

I chose snatch grip deadlifts, in order to see if they help make my chin-up stronger.

Week 1: Snatch grip dead lift 60% one rep max 3×5 sets 2 to 3 minute rest
Half kneeling landmine press: 2×5 60% one rep max (superset)

Weighted chin-up: 80% 5 rep max 2×3

Janda sit ups 2×5 ( I went from band assisted to “full on”)

Rower for distance 2500 meters

Week 2: Add 10 pounds each set on the deadlift 2 to 3 minutes rest
Half kneeling landmine press 3×3 80% one rep max
Chin up: same load add in a rep each set
Janda the same
Rower: get it done faster

Week 3:

Add ten pounds once again on the dl
Half kneeling landmine press 3×6 70%
Chin up: same load add a rep on one set
Janda: take band away 2×3
Rower: faster same distance

Week 4:

Add 20 pounds to each set on deadlift
Half kneeling landmine:  3×4 80%
Chin up: 1st set: the same for 5 2nd: 5 pounds heavier 1 3:1
Janda: 2×4
Rower: same as last week

Week 5:
Deadlift: warm up with your 70 %  5 reps 1st set, 2nd set: 80%  3 reps rest 3 minutes in both 3rd set: 90% 1 x 5 minutes rest beforehand
Chin up: 1 set: 1st set, 4 reps of previous load. 2nd set add on 10 lbs 1 rep
Janda: 2×5
Rower: slow 2500

Week 6: Deadlift: two warm up sets at 70% and 80%  3- 5 minutes rest. 3rd set: one rep max!

Day 3: Active rest: I did boxing work, you can do whatever you like without high intensity.

Day 4:
Week 1:
Dumbbell snatch 2×5 50 lbs 2 minute rest
Superset: suitcase carry 50 steps medium load work on position and
Med. Ball scoop toss: 20 lb. ball 2×8 1 minute rest
rotational med ball slam: a weight that you can move very fast. 1 minute rest 2 sets

Week 2:
Dumbbell snatch 2×5 set 3:3
Carry again but 5 steps further
Scoop toss: same but throw it further
Rotational slam: Faster

Week 3:
Dumbbell snatch 3×5
Carry go 5 pounds heavier
Scoop toss: 20lbs. 3×8 2 minutes rest
Rotational slam: Faster

Week 4:
Dumbbell snatch 5 lbs heavier 3×5
Carry: add in 5 steps a side
Scoop toss: same but 1 1/2 minutes rest
Rotational slam: Add a set in

Week 5:
Dumbbell snatch 5 lbs heavier 3×5 faster
Carry: same
Scoop toss: same but 1 minutes rest
Rotational slam: 2 pounds heavier sam reps and sets

Week 6:
Dumbbell snatch add 5 more pounds 2×5
Carry: same
Scoop toss: same but 1  minutes rest
Rotational slam: 2 pounds heavier same reps and sets

Day 4:
Week One:
Squat Jumps; 2×6 as fast as possible up and off the floor 2 minute rest
Lateral jumps over cone: 2×6
Med ball slams 10 pounds: 2x 8 as fast as possible
Kb deadswings: 3×8  2minutes medium load

Janda sit-up: 3×5

4 minute run 2 off for recovery

Week 2:

Squat Jumps; 2×7 as fast as possible up and off the floor 2 minute rest
Lateral jumps over cone: 2×7 2 minute rest
Med ball slams 10 pounds: 2x 8 as fast as possible 1 minute rest
Kb deadswings: 3×8 1 minute rest

Janda sit-up: 3×5

4 minute run 2 off for recovery work on running technique.

Week 3:

Squat Jumps; 2×8  as fast as possible up and off the floor 2 minute rest
Lateral jumps over cone: 2×8 2 minute rest
Med ball slams 10 pounds: 2×8 and 1×6, as fast as possible 1 minute rest
Kb deadswings: 3×8 30 sec. minute rest

Janda sit-up: 3×5

4 minute run 2 off for recovery add in a round

Week 4:
Squat Jumps; 2×8, 1×6 , as fast as possible up and off the floor 2 minute rest
Lateral jumps over cone: 2×7  1x 5 2 minute rest
Med ball slams 10 pounds: 3 x 8 as fast as possible 1 minute rest
Kb regular swing : 3×8 30 minute rest

Janda sit-up: 3×5

4 minute run 2 off for recovery add another easy round in

Week 5:

Squat Jumps; 3×7 as fast as possible up and off the floor 2 minute rest
Lateral jumps over cone: 3×7 2 minute rest
Med ball slams 10 pounds: 3 x 8  1 minute rest go faster with good form
Kb Regular swings : 3×8 30 minute rest

Janda sit-up: 3×5

4 minute run 2 off for recovery 4 rounds

Week 6:

Squat Jumps;3×8 as fast as possible up and off the floor 2 minute rest
Lateral jumps over cone: 3×8 2 minute rest
Med ball slams 12 pounds: 3 x 8 as fast as possible 1 minute rest
Kb deadswings: 3×10 1 minute rest

Janda sit-up: 3×5

4 minute run 2 off for recovery 5 easy runs in

There it is guys this program made a huge difference in my sprinting speed and punching power. if you feel the need adjust it to you, but don’t go crazy too early especially if this is your first time doing a cycle like this. There is much more going on than just your ability to recover in between sets and reps,but a need for your musculoskeletal system to adapt as well. So trust the process and know the why behind your need to train like this, even if it is just to change your approach for a brief while!

If you liked this post, I offer online coaching and program designing services to fit your life and to get you to your goals! Click here to learn more.

My neck hurts as I…..; my low back hurts as I squat. My shoulders hurt as I press overhead. These are common complaints that I hear from my online clients, in person and of course my fellow fitness fans. Although there can be many reasons as to why a person has pain in any given movement pattern. There may be overuse in a muscle in the chain due to imbalances and compensations or even just the old-fashioned reason of poor form as a person trains that movement. There also may be a serious medical condition such as cancer or the like. So as always if you have pain present especially if it is chronic, see your doctor.

However, this post is not about that type of pain especially since I am not a trained medical professional. This post will show you how to reduce discomfort in a movement by learning how to get your thoracic spine moving in the ways that it should; both in extension and rotation. The result of this new mobility will help you move better, feel better and could quite possibly make you stronger and more conditioned in the long run!

The t-spine or the thoracic spine is composed of 12 vertebrae and has an absolute important function in just about every exercise. The T-spine must either extend or rotate in our human movements, such as: gait (running/ walking) squatting, lunging as well as other movement patterns and exercise.

You probably now can see that if this area has too much dysfunction that it can affect the surrounding areas and create potentially dangerous compensation in other movement patterns and exercises. In other words lack of mobility and stability in this area can lead to injury in places such as: the low back, neck or potentially other areas as well by creating undue strain in another area as a result of the aforementioned dysfunction. 

So then you see that if it is not functioning well we will want to make it better by specific drills to do so. Not just from a health perspective but problems in this area can also lead to poor performance in your training or in your chosen sport. So sometimes mobility in conjunction with stability work followed by re-patterning; can lead to better strength gains in people who are training and having some difficulty getting better at their pursuit.

The way that the thoracic spine moves:

Your mid-back is designed to move in two ways and if you are extremely deficient in them your chances of getting injured are much higher.

The first movement is rotation.

Your middle spine should be able to rotate almost equally from side to side. This movement is seen in walking, running and in many lifting moves. Failure to rotate well here can lead to all kinds of problems and pain in any area that the movement pattern involves. For example if you cannot rotate form you thorax, you will rotate too much form somewhere else as I wrote about earlier.

Good                                                                                               You’ll need some work

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The second move is extension.

This movement mostly happens at the lower part of this area. once again failure to have this movement in the t-spine will usually lead to ugly overhead form, possible injury and overuse of the low back in order to try to extend and to get in the right position for overhead work.

Good                                                                                       You’ll need some work

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Fixing these issues:

First thing first there should be some kind of assessment to find out if your t-spine is the problem. Then from there, a break down should take place to find the one of more things that can be corrected to improve these movement patterns.

Step One: Check breathing:

Lack of proper breathing patterns can create tightness in your neck, upper back, chest as well as other areas in our bodies. To see if you are breathing well stick one of your hands on your chest and one on your belly. Take a breath in through your nose and see what moves first and what area you are breathing into.

Then place your thumbs on your back and other fingers in the front of you. Once again take a breath in and see what is moving as a result of your breathing.

Did your chest rise up first? Did you feel it in your neck? If so you have dysfunctional breathing and will want to make it better.

Not having these qualities in our training can lead to injury and most likely will keep you from getting the results that you want from your fitness training. So don’t be one of those people who don’t spend time on training joint mobility.

Step Two:  Check your rotation:

This post is geared towards people who are doing a self assessment and don’t necessarily have someone to look at their t-spine function. In light of that, the following assessment you can do yourself, if you are simply aware of your position and breathing as you do it.

Step Three: Cervical rotation/ extension

At times due to the closeness of a person’s neck to their t-spine, one can compensate for another. This can lead to lots of tightness in a person’s neck and possible injury as the person works out.

Good                                                                                          You’ll need some work

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Step Four: Check your extension

As I stated earlier, your mid-back shouldn’t be able to just rotate but also extend as well. Failure to do so often leads to the dreaded rib-cage flair,  low back pain, shoulder instability and not being able to live up to your full potential as a lifter! (Oh-no!)

Finally: fix what is going on.

Drills to improve these movement issues:

Breathing:

Rotation:

Neck drills:

Extension:

Taking care of this area doesn’t guarantee that you will never be hurt, but not taking care of it is to leave things up to chance and most likely not end up living up to your potential in fitness. So make sure that you spend time on these drills especially the ones that you need the most improvement in. If you don’t you are simply a slacker! (J/K) But, really, you are!
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While I was training two friends that worked out together with me and were doing Romanian Deadlifts with dumbbells; a very overweight gym goer approached us and then told one of my clients, that they would hurt the student’s back. As a result of this well-meaning ladies exhortation, I had to virtually talk this lady off a proverbial ledge and re-assure her of this particular exercise’s safety for her lumbar.

That was over ten years ago and these fear still plagues gym goers everywhere and that is what this post is about. So read on friends.

Before I begin my rant on low-back safety and health, I want to talk about the lumbar spine and  its function . First of all, in movement our body works in a concept called the joint by joint approach or regional interdependence. This concept is a pretty simple one; when it comes to movement, some parts of our system should be more mobile and others more stable. In this science, we find that the lumbar are is one that requires more stability than mobility although it is made to move as well. (More on that in a bit)

So many times we end up injured in my opinion due to the fact that we don’t understand and apply this concept to our fitness and lives.

Just before I completely begin this rant and its application to our training, let’s discuss the low back and how it should be treated during our training and life. The lumbar spine consists of 5 vertebrae and at connects to sacrum an area that has five fused vertebrae and finally ends at the coccyx which is often referred to as the tail-bone.

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The muscles of this area are a force couple known as the lumbar erectors and are multifidi, longissimus thoracis, Iliocostalis lumborum and others these muscles are very small in comparison to the neighboring glutes and lats above and in our lifting should be treated as such.

The movements that the low back can do are as follows:

Extension, flexion, rotation, and lateral flexion or bending; these movements are and can be relatively safe within reason. However, too much of these and or with loading can lead to injury and pain. Yet, on the other side of this coin, one should be able to do these moves in order to have a healthy spine and to keep their movement vitality.

There is also another issue that needs to be dealt with as well; most of us have not so good to terrible posture due to excessive sitting or standing. This places us in either a forward head or an excessively extended posture and can cause things to get shortened and tight that shouldn’t as well as cause muscles that should be active to be under active.

Now that you understand the anatomy and function of the low back, we can begin to understand how to train in a way that will make your chances of injury lessen even if you have been injured in the past.

Let’s go back to few a paragraphs ago and review a concept that we already stated. That being that the lumbar area is built to be mostly stable. This does not mean that there is never motion in it as we move, in fact the opposite is true, as you move, so does your spine. The problem comes into play though when it moves too much and we go too often into the end ranges of the spine as we move.

This includes too much rotation through the low back and way too much extension and flexion. So you see when it comes to low back pain, in most cases it is not necessarily the movement and how it may look to the outsider without the training needed to identify what is potentially dangerous and what is not. It is more a matter of not being able to control the lumbo-pelvic complex as we move and as a result going into hyper-extension and so-on.

Does this mean that everything is safe for everyone all of the time and people should just go crazy and do whatever? The answer of course is no, because of the simple fact that what doesn’t hurt one person, could injure another. This is why some sort of assessment should be administered before a person begins to embark on their fitness journey. This should find any limitations in movement, any potential pain provoking movements and a referral should be given to a qualified medical professional if there is pain present during the performance of a movement pattern.

Then as we go along any issues with mobility and stability can and should be dealt with as well as the avoidance of any pain provoking moves until the issue is dealt with if at all possible. Also as we train, in order to maintain a healthy lumbar spine, we must pay attention to our hip position and spinal position in our movements.

If one can do that and stabilize as their spinal column they can most likely do movements that may be potentially dangerous, if they have not developed the mobility and control that is needed. An advanced trainee not only has arrived to higher than their peers levels of strength and work capacity, but  have also learned how to control themselves in movement and as a result can do the movements that require higher levels of awareness.

Another important aspect to this whole concept is the need for the muscles involved in a pattern to be firing both unconsciously and consciously  in a movement in order to keep the neighboring muscles form being overworked and creating pain and undue stresses to the joints in that exercise. In the case of the low-back it is often the glutes and some of the ab muscles.

This is why any good program will have built-in it proper progressions and regressions in order to make sure that the requisite muscles are firing quick enough to do an exercise safely. Another example of this is just yesterday a man was doing a high bridge and the gym and someone commented on how he was hurting his back as he did it. My response was the opposite of what he expected, “not as long as he is using his glutes!”

These also goes for every move that requires hip extension from the rest/ rack position in KB sport, to a bench pressing power lifter and the hip extension moment on a good Olympic lifter’s snatch and clean.

If you take away anything form this post and all its science sounding jargon and voodoo. Let it be that exercise tolerance and ability is an individual thing and should be treated as such. As well as the fact that just because something may cause one person pain, doesn’t mean that it will do the same in another. Just make sure to be assessed before you begin to train and follow a progressive strength and conditioning program that will meet your needs and weaknesses as a person. Lastly if something hurts you don’t do it. However, don’t try to make others do the same as you and write off a sport or exercise as dangerous to all!

I prefer a balanced training approach in which one trains with high intensity at times and then backs off recovers and then kills it again. ( To learn more about this concept stay tuned this blog and my Ten fitness commandment series.) So I endeavor to apply that to these workouts as we all do them to make sure that we are get the most of it. This week’s workout is a real challenge and it will strengthen your grip, heart and legs, while hacking off fat! This workout was created for one of my advanced clients and he loved it and so will you as you do it!

Weekly Workout: The can you finish it

This is an as many rounds as possible workout with good form and there is an advanced approach to it an intermediate and a beginners.

1. Advanced:
Don’t set the bells down until you do all the move in sequence
Use 2 kettlebells for all the moves 
Go heavy for you!
Farmer’s walks for 60 steps

2. Intermediate:

Use two bells for the carries and rows, but do a single arm racked squat.
Go pretty heavy for you
Set them down if you need to
Farmer’s walks for 55 steps

3. Beginner :

Rest in between moves, 10 to 20 seconds.
Do a goblet squat and one arm row
Farmer’s carry with 2 bells for 50 steps
Use challenging weight

As I stated earlier this workout is as many rounds as possible with good form. So set a timer for 10 to 15 minutes and go to town by doing 8 rows, your steps of farmer’s walk (depending on which level you chose.) and finally 5 squats. 

Once again we have your guidelines for success

  • Do all of your sets and reps with quality form. Crap only produces crap!
  • Breathe by matching your breathing with each pattern
  • Rest as much as you need to and no more.
  • Tough it out while working out ( keep in mind the results)
  • Enjoy the fat blasting effect  and raised metabolism.

Click here to get my Ultimate Kettlebell swing Tutorial and workout series. This series will not teach you the swing,  but show you  how to train with it to get to your goals!

Kettlebell training is extremely versatile and if need be, it can be your only form of training or you can couple them with other forms of training to aid in your goals. Today’s workout is a hybrid session involving one of my favorite kettlebell moves and one of my favorite bodyweight upper body moves. Those are the jerk/push-press and pull-ups/chin-ups. I have been loving this combo and now, I want to share it with you!

This week’s ditty can be scaled to all levels by doing a push-press instead of a jerk and doing chin-ups (or your progression) instead of the whole pull-up. You can also train power by going with heavy double kettlebells and lower reps or do conditioning by higher reps with lighter bells or a single bell. You can also choose to re-clean the bell after every rep. to add in more work for the time period that you will be training.

Do your pull-ups/chin-ups in a ladder style after doing your jerk or push-press. In other words do a set of 8 jerks then 1 upper pulling move. Then do another set of 8 and 2 and so-on. After you finish the whole ladder rest 2 to 5 minutes and do it all over again for up to 5 rounds. ( as long as you can keep your form) Then you can smile and know that you overcame a jerk of a workout!

A video of the KB Jerk (hard style):

Chin-up Demo:

The guidelines for success:

KIWK workout of the week- the drop down

  • Do all of your sets and reps with quality form. Crap only produces crap!
  • Breathe by matching your breathing with each pattern
  • Rest as much as you need to and no more.
  • Tough it out while working out ( keep in mind the results)
  • Enjoy the fat blasting effect  and raised metabolism.

So enjoy this workout friends and the fat blasting after effect that it will bring you as you train using this challenging workout.

Also as a gift to you; I want to share with you my free videos series on how to do the kettlebell swing properly for strength and conditioning,  Click here for it.

I am sad that this is the last post of this series and that this is the very last concept that is designed to help you with your program design and getting to your fitness goals. If you apply these ideas, you will experience much bigger and long-term gains in your fitness training. If you need further help with them, I offer an online coaching and program design service that will help you do just that guaranteed!

This final principle is very important to your specific goals and your success in achieving them. You will probably not get to exactly where you want to be, if you don’t train specifically for your goals when you are that point when you need to. This covers the type of training that you do, (energy systems and movements) at least in the long run. This doesn’t meant that G. P.P (General preparation training) doesn’t have a place in an overall goal. It just means that you just cannot stay there and get everything out of your training that you want from it!

That is what this idea is about, it goes along the line that; if you want to have a strong back squat, you must do that move. If you want to run faster or further, you must do that as well and so onThen you will also want to structure your strength training in way that will compliment that goal. For example there is a lot of evidence that shows that getting stronger and increasing ground reaction forces can increase your running speed and distance. So you could specifically lift with that goal in mind and then move on into your complimentary endurance work with weights. So you see we went from general to specific in terms of energy systems.

Another approach that I usually like to help improve athletes athleticism is the very specific approach of getting them better at the things that they don’t do so well. For example, if they are slower than they should be, we will work specific strength exercises that build force in the realm of speed. While using patterning drills and other tools such as parachutes and the like to make the person faster.

This approach can be harder to do in programming, it requires that one know research and training principles and it also takes a lot if thought to design a program as such. It will however, give you the most specific results possible form your training and get you the most results.

In light of that just about everything will get you some results, but if you are like me, you have a very specific set of goals and nothing else will cut it!

Assessment for specificity:

It seems like there has been a pull-up/chin-up craze at the gym that I train out of lately; as a result. I have been doing a lot of pull-up progression drills with my clients. But just before we begin to work on them and getting them better and stronger, I usually have my students try to do one first and find out where they get “stuck’ and then begin to incorporate specific drills to get to them this very reasonable drill! So know where to start in order to get better at any movement that fits your goals.

Reassessment:
After a sometime spent training you will then want to look at how much progress that you have made and if there is anything else that you will want to train to own the move that you desire to get to. You simply do that by doing the same assessment that you used to start the program in the first place. Whether it is a movement screen, your 40 time, vertical jump height and so-on!



Remembering this principle and applying it can be the difference between you having the fitness results that you want and get the return from your training that you desire. So know your goal and then plan it out, get plenty of rest and recovery. Overload your body and apply the GAS principle as you do, you will finally have success and spend less time frustrated with your fitness training! As I have been saying over the last few weeks, Thou shalt…….!