Meet me

Welcome to my blog, My name is Moses Correa and I am a fitness trainer, movement and strength coach as well as a certified kettlebell instructor.

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Creds:
RKC  1&2 Certified Kettlebell Instructor
KIWK certified group Kettlebell Instructor
Functional movement systems expert
Aerosling certified
ISSA certified(2004)
NCSF certifed (2008)
NKT Certified
FMT 1 and 2

Have you ever struggled with feelings of inferiority and a lack of real and lasting training results? Do you think that there is no hope for you and that you aren’t one of those “gifted” people? Maybe you don’t struggle with any of these feelings, yet you keep get hurt and or are feeling burned out and tired from your workouts. If any of these is true of you, then this story may very well be the most important story you may have ever read.

During my childhood I was either overweight or really skinny. As you may be aware people tend to react in a not so positive way when you are either one of those. I heard critical things such as, “You are too heavy” or “What happened to you?! You are too skinny?!” And my favorites: “Are you on drugs?” and “Do you even eat?” All of this took a toll on me as a teenager, as you can imagine. In addition to this struggle with weight, I also was the weakest and un-athletic of my three brothers. All of these factors led to feelings of inferiority that was reinforced by all of the seemingly effortless accomplishments of my older siblings in their athletic or fitness endeavors. It wasn’t that I wasn’t trying because I did box and play other sports during those years. I had a winning record in boxing; in fact, my very first fight ended with me stopping my opponent in the first round, yet I still felt weak and less than I should be.

 

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As time went on and I grew older, I still exercised on and off. While I was exercising, I would get leaner and a little more muscular- yet something was missing in my programs. Life went on as it does and my obligations grew, so I stopped being active. I gained fat, became de-conditioned and felt worse than ever. My feelings of weakness, insecurity and inadequacy grew in me like never before. I lived in this misery for a few years, just as a pig wallows in the mud. After staying in this state for a few years and feeling frustrated about my state, I became involved in a boxing program given through the church I went to. This event was so life changing for me. I began to learn a new boxing style from my coach at that time, one based on the style of the great Muhammad Ali. I also learned how to eat better and that lead to a leaner body as I applied the principles that I was taught. I began to develop confidence in myself as I lost fat, got stronger and developed more endurance. I can recall feeling pretty awesome as I began to notice my muscles develop and grow. There truly is no better encouragement than seeing your body transform right before your eyes. I felt like I had finally arrived in my fitness.

 

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However, in spite of those feelings of success, I was headed towards some serious problems, because of my lack of a good foundation based on proper movement which was reinforced by my peers and my over-training. You see what I didn’t know back then was that true fitness qualities need to be built on the bed rock of proper movement. Since I failed to acknowledge this truth, my likelihood of injury went up and my results eventually went down. In addition to lacking quality movement, I also was not striking a balance between training and rest. I was under the self-imposed delusion that if I did more, I would keep getting better. I was blindly headed towards disaster and just keep on pushing ahead. I kept on doing movements until they turned into horrendous pieces of crap and was even proud of it. I thought that I possessed a superior work ethic and an “elite” level of fitness that many could only dream to arrive at. I was always drained, tired and often sick during that time in my life. It didn’t occur to me that I was doing it to myself; I blamed it on my schedule and perceived lack of sleep.

I still remember the day that my calf tore. I experienced so much pain. It felt like a piece of paper tore in my lower leg as it ripped. I was sitting in the audience at my girlfriend’s musical performance, and I couldn’t focus on the show, only the pain. I didn’t know what was happening – the pain came from nowhere; it wasn’t like I was in the middle of activity. As a result of the injury, I couldn’t even walk well for a few weeks and my boxing career suffered as a result of this injury. I have not fought a fight since that time. I also suffered emotionally, I felt like a pile of crap because I couldn’t do what I loved. Once again I was right back where I started de-conditioned and gaining fat. After my calf healed and I was able to begin training again, as I started to make progress I once again got injured. This time it was more serious and painful- in fact in ended up with me in the hospital. I pulled muscles on my ribs and it even hurt to breathe. I can recall watching the Simpson’s movie as I was recovering and being in extreme pain as I laughed at the funny parts. I felt extremely depressed and kept wondering if it all would turn around for me and if I would ever be able to train again. In addition, there were the financial implications of having to take time off, which made everything harder for me.

I knew that I desperately needed a change, because if I kept going the way that I was I would keep ending up hurt. Around 2006 and just before all of these injuries happened, I had started to train with kettlebells occasionally. I didn’t really train with them often because I thought I needed variety not to plateau. I also mistakenly thought they were “just another way to train.” Man! Was I completely and entirely wrong on that one! I am glad that I began to research Kettlebell training more in depth. Because as I did I found out that Kettlebell training was a super and safe way to train and to become what I wanted to be. I had finally found the answer and hope for all of my issues with esteem and fitness.

During my researching a friend of mine loaned me a copy of Enter the Kettlebell by Pavel. As I read it, I learned how to improve my technique and learned a lot about the basics of Kettlebell training. Since then I have earned the RKC certification and have had the privilege of learning from some of the top instructors in the field. I have put on a lot of muscle, gotten stronger, am moving better than ever and thankfully have been injury free. More importantly I finally have the confidence that I had been searching for when I was younger. I no longer compare myself to my brothers because I no longer need to. Moving well is my priority over all other fitness pursuits in order to get the most out of my training and to stay healthy. However, my journey is far from over. I am continuing to learn and get tremendous results for my clients and myself. I look forward to continuing to share the joy and results that I have and continue to experience.

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All of my experiences and education enable me to be a help to just about everyone who is willing to change. Whether you are a beginner that needs guidance, I can get you to your goals safely. Or if you are a person that has been injured and wants to return to a program that will safely get you results, then I would like to help you. I will help you undo most of the damage that may be done to your movement and then lead you to a new world of strength, mobility, fat loss and health.

I would love to share all of my knowledge and experiences with you. Drop me a line at moses@mosescorrea.com and let’s get to know each other and talk about your goals. I know that I can help you reach them!
For more information follow the links below:

RKC Instructor page:

http://www.dragondoor.com/instructors/rkc_instructors/?q=search&F_FirstName=moses&F_LastName=correa&F_Certification=1

FMS expert page:

http://www.functionalmovement.com/experts/mo12ed

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