It seems that training in some ways has become a mindless endeavor for many. Go to any gym near you and observe what people do, you will see people pretty much doing the same things regardless of their goals and fitness levels. It seems that at these places the trainers do not help as well. They have their people doing things that aren’t the most effective things in the world and forget about the individual and their needs/goals. One of the things that I see often is the very ineffective and outdated approach to movement preparation or a warm-up. This approach only serves as an opportunity to get your body temperature up, but not prepare your brain and body for the upcoming session.

 

Movement prep. is a very different and a more effective way of warming up than the previous form. It is a very structured way of preparing for training that is mindful of your unique issues and helps you get the focus that you need to correct them  before and as you train. This type of perpetration for training helps you move better and as result to get better results from your training session and program overall. How then will you go about this and what approach should you take in order to get this awesome benefit? That is exactly what the next few paragraphs will answer and even give you some principles to apply to get the most out of this warm-up approach.

 

First and foremost work on mobility:

Mobility is our body’s ability to move in all of the directions that we are supposed to and need to move without restriction. Having proper mobility is important and necessary for good exercise technique. For a second let’s think about the deadlift and how many people cannot get into the right position to safely do this move. Then they hurt their back and say that “Deadlifts are bad!” In this case this injury probably could have been avoided if they had spent time on mobility and done elevated Deadlifts for a while. (By the way if this is you, use the principles in this video to fix the problem. Keep in mind the swing is a deadlift!)

 

Now with that in mind you will do the drills given in the video before doing any hip-hinging movements and add it into your warm-ups in general. If you have trouble squatting as deep as your hip structure will allow you can follow the drills given in this post.  As well as other such exercises, like a chest press movement, you can work on posture and so-on. You just need to know your issues and then keep at them and then maintain them afterwards. Lastly, you can do a general mobility approach and just work on all joints and movements to get or keep them  free.

Then comes stability work:

Stability work isn’t just for single leg stance; it is your ability to control your body against outside forces. (E.g. a loaded move etc.) In light of that stability work for you could be simply squatting without leaning forward into a good morning type move. So you will want to practice doing that in your warm-up, so that you will be aware and better apt to practice squatting well as you train. This will be done by doing the drill that makes you move better; whatever that particular drill may be.

We can also address such things as a Valgus collapse (the knee bowing inwards as you squat or hinge) in this preparation time. This is as simple as sticking a band over both or the one knee that collapses and pushing into the band to build up awareness of its position. In addition to these moves we can learn to stabilize any joint in this time. The good news is that it can only take a few minutes to do and you will be in a much better place of success in doing so!

Whatever your particular issues may be or if you feel like you don’t have any (By the way, we all do). I would choose this type of warm-up over the mindless walking on a machine to nowhere.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s